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Book Murder at the Supreme Court

Download or read book Murder at the Supreme Court written by Martin Clancy and published by Prometheus Books. This book was released on 2013-02-19 with total page 392 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: This in-depth yet highly accessible books provides compelling human stories that illuminate the thorny legal issues behind the most noteworthy capital cases. In 1969, the Supreme Court justices cast votes in secret that could have signaled the end of the death penalty. Later, the justices’ resolve began to unravel. Why? What were the consequences for the rule of law and for the life at stake in the case? These are some of the fascinating questions answered in Murder at the Supreme Court. Veteran journalists Martin Clancy and Tim O’Brien not only pull back the curtain of secrecy that surrounds Supreme Court deliberations but also reveal the crucial links between landmark capital-punishment cases and the lethal crimes at their root. The authors take readers to crime scenes, holding cells, jury rooms, autopsy suites, and execution chambers to provide true-life reporting on vicious criminals and the haphazard judicial system that punishes them. The cases reported are truly "the cases that made the law." They have defined the parameters that judges must follow for a death sentence to stand up on appeal. Beyond the obvious questions regarding the dubious deterrent effect of capital punishment or whether retribution is sufficient justification for the death penalty (regardless of the heinous nature of the crimes committed), the cases and crimes examined in this book raise other confounding issues: Is lethal injection really more humane than other methods of execution? Should a mentally ill killer be forcibly medicated to make him "well enough" to be executed? How does the race of the perpetrator or the victim influence sentencing? Is heinous rape a capital crime? How young is too young to be executed?

Book In Spite of Innocence

    Book Details:
  • Author : Michael L. Radelet
  • Publisher :
  • Release : 1992
  • ISBN :
  • Pages : 424 pages

Download or read book In Spite of Innocence written by Michael L. Radelet and published by . This book was released on 1992 with total page 424 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: The stories of some 400 innocent Americans who were falsely convicted of capital crimes.

Book Capital Punishment

    Book Details:
  • Author : United States. Congress. House. Committee on the Judiciary. Subcommittee No. 3
  • Publisher :
  • Release : 1972
  • ISBN :
  • Pages : 486 pages

Download or read book Capital Punishment written by United States. Congress. House. Committee on the Judiciary. Subcommittee No. 3 and published by . This book was released on 1972 with total page 486 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt:

Book The Death Penalty

    Book Details:
  • Author : Stuart BANNER
  • Publisher : Harvard University Press
  • Release : 2009-06-30
  • ISBN : 0674020510
  • Pages : 398 pages

Download or read book The Death Penalty written by Stuart BANNER and published by Harvard University Press. This book was released on 2009-06-30 with total page 398 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: The death penalty arouses our passions as does few other issues. Some view taking another person's life as just and reasonable punishment while others see it as an inhumane and barbaric act. But the intensity of feeling that capital punishment provokes often obscures its long and varied history in this country. Now, for the first time, we have a comprehensive history of the death penalty in the United States. Law professor Stuart Banner tells the story of how, over four centuries, dramatic changes have taken place in the ways capital punishment has been administered and experienced. In the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries, the penalty was standard for a laundry list of crimes--from adultery to murder, from arson to stealing horses. Hangings were public events, staged before audiences numbering in the thousands, attended by women and men, young and old, black and white alike. Early on, the gruesome spectacle had explicitly religious purposes--an event replete with sermons, confessions, and last minute penitence--to promote the salvation of both the condemned and the crowd. Through the nineteenth century, the execution became desacralized, increasingly secular and private, in response to changing mores. In the twentieth and twenty-first centuries, ironically, as it has become a quiet, sanitary, technological procedure, the death penalty is as divisive as ever. By recreating what it was like to be the condemned, the executioner, and the spectator, Banner moves beyond the debates, to give us an unprecedented understanding of capital punishment's many meanings. As nearly four thousand inmates are now on death row, and almost one hundred are currently being executed each year, the furious debate is unlikely to diminish. The Death Penalty is invaluable in understanding the American way of the ultimate punishment. Table of Contents: Abbreviations Introduction 1. Terror, Blood, and Repentance 2. Hanging Day 3. Degrees of Death 4. The Origins of Opposition 5. Northern Reform, Southern Retention 6. Into the Jail Yard 7. Technological Cures 8. Decline 9. To the Supreme Court 10. Resurrection Epilogue Appendix: Counting Executions Notes Acknowledgments Index Reviews of this book: [Banner] deftly balances history and politics, crafting a book that will be valuable to anyone interested in knowing more about capital punishment, no matter what his or her views are on the ethical issues surrounding the topic. --David Pitt, Booklist Reviews of this book: In this well-researched and clear account...Banner charts how and why this country went from having one of the world's mildest punitive systems to one of its harshest. --Publishers Weekly Reviews of this book: Stuart Banner's book is fine and balanced and important. His lucid history of this grim subject is scrupulously accurate...It is refreshingly free of the tendentiousness and the sensationalism that this subject invites. --Richard A. Posner, New Republic Reviews of this book: [The] contrast between the past and the present can now be seen with great clarity thanks to...Stuart Banner and his comprehensive book, The Death Penalty...American historians have been slow to undertake anything like a full-scale study of the subject...Banner's book does much to fill [the gaps]. His book is an important and comprehensive...treatment of the topic. --Hugo Adam Bedau, Boston Review Reviews of this book: Despite the gruesome nature of the book's topic, it is difficult to stop reading. Banner's research is fascinating, his writing style compelling. Given the emotional nature of the subject (few people known to me are wishy-washy about whether the death penalty is moral or immoral), Banner walks the line of neutrality skillfully, without seeming evasive. --Steve Weinberg, Legal Times Reviews of this book: Stuart Banner's The Death Penalty is a tour de force, remarkable for its neutrality as it traces the ways in which the death penalty has been applied, and for what kinds of crimes, from the Colonial era to the present. Banner...writes like a historian who believes perspective is best gained by dispassionately setting out what happened and letting everyone come to his or her own conclusions. I think, in this book, that works wonderfully. On a subject in which emotions run so high, it seems awfully useful to have a dispassionate voice. After all, if Banner allowed his own feelings on the death penalty--pro, con or somewhere in the middle--to be known, the book easily could be dismissed as a diatribe. He doesn't, and it can't. --Judith Neuman Beck, San Jose Mercury News Reviews of this book: Law professor Banner...offers a persuasive examination of the evolution of capital punishment from Colonial times onward. He makes clear that the death penalty has possessed generally consistent support from the US populace, although changes in the sensibilities of juries, executioners, legal theoreticians, and judges have occurred...Highly recommended. --R. C. Cottrell, Choice Reviews of this book: Stuart Banner aptly illustrates in The Death Penalty, like the nation, the death penalty has changed with the times...Banner's account spotlights a number of interesting trends in American history...Mostly evenhanded in the tour he provides through the history of the death penalty and its role in and reflection of American society, he has managed to provide an accessible look at what is a profoundly controversial and complicated subject. --Steven Martinovich, Ft. Lauderdale Sun-Sentinel Reviews of this book: "For centuries," Stuart Banner tells us, "Americans had been proud to possess a criminal-justice system that made less use of the death penalty than just about any other place on the globe, including the countries of western Europe." But no longer. Now we possess "one of the harshest criminal codes in the world." The Death Penalty helps explain that turnaround, but only in the course of a complicated story in which different factors emerge at different times to play often unforeseeable roles...[This is a] superbly told history. --Paul Rosenberg, Denver Post and Rocky Mountain News Reviews of this book: Stuart Banner's lucid, richly researched book brings us, for the first time, a comprehensive history of American capital punishment from colonial times to the present. He describes the practices that characterized the institution at different periods, elucidates their ritual purposes and social meanings, and identifies the forces that led to their transformation. The book's well-ordered narrative is interspersed with individual case histories, that give flesh and blood to the account. --David Garland, Times Literary Supplement Reviews of this book: [An] informative, even-handed, chillingly fascinating account of why and how the U.S. government and many state governments decided to sponsor executions of criminals--even though innocent defendants might die, too. --Jane Henderson, St. Louis Post-Dispatch Reviews of this book: Stuart Banner's The Death Penalty is a splendidly objective achievement. Delightfully written, free of academic pretense, liberally sprinkled with apt references from contemporary sources, the book exhaustively explores the multifaceted evolution of America's penal practices. --Elsbeth Bothe, Baltimore Sun The Death Penalty is certain to be the definitive account of the American experience with capital punishment, from its beginnings in the seventeenth century, to the execution of Timothy McVeigh in 2001. This is a first rate piece of scholarship: well written, deeply researched, fascinating to read, and full of insights and good common sense. It is, in my view, one of the finest books to deal with this troubled and troubling subject. Historical and legal scholarship owe a debt of gratitude to Stuart Banner. --Lawrence Friedman, Stanford Law School A masterful book. This is a long overdue account which fills a huge gap in our understanding of America's long and complex relationship to state killing. With meticulous scholarship and lucid prose, Banner has written a compelling account of the place of capital punishment in our society. It sets the standard for all future scholarship on the history of the death penalty in America. --Austin Sarat, author of When the State Kills: Capital Punishment and the American Condition The Death Penalty, a study we have badly needed, is the first history of the nation's engagement--as well as its disengagement--with capital punishment from the country's earliest days to the present. With a sure grasp of the constitutional issues, Stuart Banner greatly advances a conversation at last underway about the rightness of putting people to death for having inflicted a death. Banner's greatest and most useful feat is remaining dispassionate on a subject that he cares deeply about--as do a growing number of his fellow Americans. --William S. McFeely, author of Proximity to Death The Death Penalty beautifully explains the changing paths traveled by supporters and opponents of capital punishment over the years. It explores a subject of enormous symbolic importance to Americans today, linking our views about the death penalty to our larger concerns about crime. --David Oshinsky, author of "Worse Than Slavery": Parchman Farm and the Ordeal of Jim Crow Justice Banner's book is a superbly detailed and textured social history of a subject too often treated in legal abstractions. It demonstrates how capital punishment has gnawed at the conscience and imagination of Americans, and how it has challenged their efforts to define themselves culturally, politically, and racially. --Robert Weisberg, Stanford Law School

Book The Death Penalty

    Book Details:
  • Author : Rolando V. del Carmen
  • Publisher : Routledge
  • Release : 2010-07-02
  • ISBN : 1437755704
  • Pages : 447 pages

Download or read book The Death Penalty written by Rolando V. del Carmen and published by Routledge. This book was released on 2010-07-02 with total page 447 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: Bringing together the major death penalty cases decided by the U.S. Supreme Court and the legal issues related to the death penalty, this text classifies the cases according to legal issues, provides commentary on the general case law, provides a chart of the cases discussed, and then presents the legal materials in an understandable, easy-to-digest case brief format. Each chapter includes an outline; briefs for cases that include facts, holding, reasoning and opinions; summary and conclusions; and internet resources.

Book Capital Punishment

    Book Details:
  • Author : United States. Congress. House. Judiciary Committee
  • Publisher :
  • Release : 1972
  • ISBN :
  • Pages : 470 pages

Download or read book Capital Punishment written by United States. Congress. House. Judiciary Committee and published by . This book was released on 1972 with total page 470 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt:

Book Conviction

    Book Details:
  • Author : Richard North Patterson
  • Publisher :
  • Release : 2005
  • ISBN : 9780739449776
  • Pages : 930 pages

Download or read book Conviction written by Richard North Patterson and published by . This book was released on 2005 with total page 930 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: A harrowing story of a possibly innocent man, the labyrinthine politics of death row, a lawyer's personal and professional crisis.

Book The Death Penalty in America

    Book Details:
  • Author : Hugo Adam Bedau
  • Publisher : Oxford University Press
  • Release : 1998-05-28
  • ISBN : 9780195122862
  • Pages : 548 pages

Download or read book The Death Penalty in America written by Hugo Adam Bedau and published by Oxford University Press. This book was released on 1998-05-28 with total page 548 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: A. J. Richards

Book Eligible for Execution

Download or read book Eligible for Execution written by Thomas G. Walker and published by SAGE. This book was released on 2008-08-01 with total page 320 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: This riveting and enlightening narrative unfolds on the night of August 16, 1996, with the brutal and senseless murder of Eric Nesbitt, a young man stationed at Langley Air Force Base, at the hands of 18-year-old Daryl Atkins. Over the course of more than a decade, Atkins’s case has bounced between the lowest and the highest levels of the judicial system. Found guilty and then sentenced to death in 1998 for Nesbitt’s murder, the Atkins case was then taken up in 2002 by the U.S. Supreme Court. The issue before the justices: given Daryl Atkins’s mental retardation, would his execution constitute cruel and unusual punishment, in violation of the Eighth Amendment? A 6–3 vote said yes. Daryl Atkins’s situation was far from being resolved though. Prosecutors claimed that Atkins failed to meet the statutory definition of mental retardation and reinstituted procedures to carry out his death sentence. Back in circuit court, the jury returned its verdict: Daryl Atkins was not retarded. Atkins’s attorneys promptly filed a notice of appeal, and the case continues today. Drawing on interviews with key participants; direct observation of the hearings; and close examination of court documents, transcripts, and press accounts, Thomas G. Walker provides readers with a rare view of the entire judicial process. Never losing sight of the stakes in a death penalty case, he explains each step in Atkins’s legal journey from the interactions of local law enforcement, to the decision-making process of the state prosecutor, to the Supreme Court’s ruling, and beyond. Walker sheds light on how legal institutions and procedures work in real life—and how they are all interrelated—to help students better understand constitutional issues, the courts, and the criminal justice system. Throughout, Walker also addresses how disability, race, and other key demographic and social issues affect the case and society’s views on the death penalty.

Book Routledge Handbook on Capital Punishment

Download or read book Routledge Handbook on Capital Punishment written by Robert M. Bohm and published by Routledge. This book was released on 2017-12-15 with total page 896 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: Capital punishment is one of the more controversial subjects in the social sciences, especially in criminal justice and criminology. Over the last decade or so, the United States has experienced a significant decline in the number of death sentences and executions. Since 2007, eight states have abolished capital punishment, bringing the total number of states without the death penalty to 19, plus the District of Columbia, and more are likely to follow suit in the near future (Nebraska reinstated its death penalty in 2016). Worldwide, 70 percent of countries have abolished capital punishment in law or in practice. The current trend suggests the eventual demise of capital punishment in all but a few recalcitrant states and countries. Within this context, a fresh look at capital punishment in the United States and worldwide is warranted. The Routledge Handbook on Capital Punishment comprehensively examines the topic of capital punishment from a wide variety of perspectives. A thoughtful introductory chapter from experts Bohm and Lee presents a contextual framework for the subject matter, and chapters present state-of-the-art analyses of a range of aspects of capital punishment, grouped into five sections: (1) Capital Punishment: History, Opinion, and Culture; (2) Capital Punishment: Rationales and Religious Views; (3) Capital Punishment and Constitutional Issues; (4) The Death Penalty’s Administration; and (5) The Death Penalty’s Consequences. This is a key collection for students taking courses in prisons, penology, criminal justice, criminology, and related subjects, and is also an essential reference for academics and practitioners working in prison service or in related agencies.

Book The Execution of Willie Francis

Download or read book The Execution of Willie Francis written by Gilbert King and published by Civitas Books. This book was released on 2009-02-24 with total page 0 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: On May 3, 1946, in St. Martinsville, Louisiana, a seventeen-year-old black boy was scheduled for execution by electric chair. Willie Francis had been charged with murder; his trial had been brief; his death sentence never in doubt. When the executioners flipped the switch, Willie screamed and writhed as electricity coursed through his body. But Willie Francis did not die. Having miraculously survived, Willie was informed that the state would attempt to execute him a second time within a week. The ensuing legal battle went all the way to the Supreme Court, asking: Could the state electrocute someone twice? A gripping narrative about a brutal crime and its shocking aftermath, The Execution of Willie Francis offers a heroic—and ultimately tragic—tale of one man's quest for moral justice in a nation still blinded by race.

Book Invitation to an Execution

Download or read book Invitation to an Execution written by Gordon Morris Bakken and published by UNM Press. This book was released on 2010-11-16 with total page 694 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: Until the early twentieth century, printed invitations to executions issued by lawmen were a vital part of the ritual of death concluding a criminal proceeding in the United States. In this study, Gordon Morris Bakken invites readers to an understanding of the death penalty in America with a collection of essays that trace the history and politics of this highly charged moral, legal, and cultural issue. Bakken has solicited essays from historians, political scientists, and lawyers to ensure a broad treatment of the evolution of American cultural attitudes about crime and capital punishment. Part one of this extensive analysis focuses on politics, legal history, multicultural issues, and the international aspects of the death penalty. Part two offers a regional analysis with essays that put death penalty issues into a geographic and cultural context. Part three focuses on specific states with emphasis on the need to understand capital punishment in terms of state law development, particularly because states determine on whom the death penalty will be imposed. Part four examines the various means of death, from hanging to lethal injection, in state law case studies. And finally, part five focuses on the portrayal of capital punishment in popular culture.

Book The Hanged Man

Download or read book The Hanged Man written by Mike Richards and published by Scribe Publications Pty Limited. This book was released on 2002 with total page 552 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: "Ronald Joseph Ryan was hanged in Melbourne on 3 February 1967, following his conviction for the shooting murder of a prison warder during a daring escape from the maximum-security Pentridge prison thirteen months before." "The decision of the Victorian government in December 1966 to proceed with Ryan's death sentence sparked immediate media condemnation and angry political protests, and put the Liberal premier, Sir Henry Bolte, under siege for the duration of the case." "State governments around the country moved to abolish the death penalty in the 1970s and 1980s, and Ronald Ryan became the last man to be hanged in Australia. Thirty-five years later, the Ryan case still prompts spirited debate about the guilty finding against Ryan, the merits of capital punishment, and the politics behind his execution." "But who was Ronald Ryan, and how did he come to be the focus of such dramatic political events? Drawing on previously unpublished documents and personal accounts - including details of Ryan's childhood and his early turn to crime - this book reveals the truth about Ryan's guilt. It also goes behind the scenes to tell for the first time of the life-long anguish of the judge who pronounced the death sentence, the inner workings of the secret cabinet meeting that decided Ryan's fate, and the dramatic political process that resulted in the rejection of eleventh-hour appeals to save Ryan."--BOOK JACKET.Title Summary field provided by Blackwell North America, Inc. All Rights Reserved

Book Crime and Capital Punishment

Download or read book Crime and Capital Punishment written by Arnold Barnett and published by Forgotten Books. This book was released on 2015-06-16 with total page 65 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: Excerpt from Crime and Capital Punishment: Some Recent Studies In November, 1976, the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, arguably the most liberal state in the nation, put a gun-control proposition on its ballot. The proposal was defeated by what Newsweek called "a stunning 3-1 margin." Presumably a question on the same ballot about restoring the death penalty would not have fared so badly, for a capital punishment bill had sailed through the Massachusetts Legislature, which failed later by only one vote to override the Governor's veto. In December, 1976, New Jersey became the 35th state since 1972 to pass new laws that provided capital sanctions in certain homicide cases. The events in Massachusetts and the rest of the nation make clear that, rightly or wrongly, the restoration of capital punishment has become the linchpin of the American people's response to the doubling of murder rates in the last decade. Gun control measures, attempts to reduce media violence, and more general social and economic reforms have been accorded a much lower priority in the national consensus. It seems probable that, first erratically, then more regularly, executions will take place in America throughout the forseeable future. It seems fair to say that America's historical experience with the death penalty - which includes thousands of executions earlier this century - has had minimal net impact on the evolving national decision to restore capital punishment. The Supreme Court, for example, in its 1976 decision authorizing the resumption of executions, stressed that it had reached no conclusions on whether past executions had served to deter murders. It would be one thing if this situation arose because those who had studied past murder and execution data found them inherently inconclusive on deterrence questions. About the Publisher Forgotten Books publishes hundreds of thousands of rare and classic books. Find more at www.forgottenbooks.com This book is a reproduction of an important historical work. Forgotten Books uses state-of-the-art technology to digitally reconstruct the work, preserving the original format whilst repairing imperfections present in the aged copy. In rare cases, an imperfection in the original, such as a blemish or missing page, may be replicated in our edition. We do, however, repair the vast majority of imperfections successfully; any imperfections that remain are intentionally left to preserve the state of such historical works.

Book Official Reports of the Supreme Court

Download or read book Official Reports of the Supreme Court written by United States. Supreme Court and published by . This book was released on 1982 with total page 1092 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt:

Book Capital Punishment

Download or read book Capital Punishment written by and published by . This book was released on 1982 with total page 120 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt:

Book The Oxford companion to the Supreme Court of the United States

Download or read book The Oxford companion to the Supreme Court of the United States written by and published by . This book was released on with total page 1270 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: