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Book Gotham

    Book Details:
  • Author : Edwin G. Burrows
  • Publisher : Oxford University Press
  • Release : 1998-11-19
  • ISBN : 0199729107
  • Pages : 1412 pages

Download or read book Gotham written by Edwin G. Burrows and published by Oxford University Press. This book was released on 1998-11-19 with total page 1412 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: To European explorers, it was Eden, a paradise of waist-high grasses, towering stands of walnut, maple, chestnut, and oak, and forests that teemed with bears, wolves, raccoons, beavers, otters, and foxes. Today, it is the site of Broadway and Wall Street, the Empire State Building and the Statue of Liberty, and the home of millions of people, who have come from every corner of the nation and the globe. In Gotham, Edwin G. Burrows and Mike Wallace have produced a monumental work of history, one that ranges from the Indian tribes that settled in and around the island of Manna-hata, to the consolidation of the five boroughs into Greater New York in 1898. It is an epic narrative, a story as vast and as varied as the city it chronicles, and it underscores that the history of New York is the story of our nation. Readers will relive the tumultuous early years of New Amsterdam under the Dutch West India Company, Peter Stuyvesant's despotic regime, Indian wars, slave resistance and revolt, the Revolutionary War and the defeat of Washington's army on Brooklyn Heights, the destructive seven years of British occupation, New York as the nation's first capital, the duel between Aaron Burr and Alexander Hamilton, the Erie Canal and the coming of the railroads, the growth of the city as a port and financial center, the infamous draft riots of the Civil War, the great flood of immigrants, the rise of mass entertainment such as vaudeville and Coney Island, the building of the Brooklyn Bridge and the birth of the skyscraper. Here too is a cast of thousands--the rebel Jacob Leisler and the reformer Joanna Bethune; Clement Moore, who saved Greenwich Village from the city's street-grid plan; Herman Melville, who painted disillusioned portraits of city life; and Walt Whitman, who happily celebrated that same life. We meet the rebel Jacob Leisler and the reformer Joanna Bethune; Boss Tweed and his nemesis, cartoonist Thomas Nast; Emma Goldman and Nellie Bly; Jacob Riis and Horace Greeley; police commissioner Theodore Roosevelt; Colonel Waring and his "white angels" (who revolutionized the sanitation department); millionaires John Jacob Astor, Cornelius Vanderbilt, August Belmont, and William Randolph Hearst; and hundreds more who left their mark on this great city. The events and people who crowd these pages guarantee that this is no mere local history. It is in fact a portrait of the heart and soul of America, and a book that will mesmerize everyone interested in the peaks and valleys of American life as found in the greatest city on earth. Gotham is a dazzling read, a fast-paced, brilliant narrative that carries the reader along as it threads hundreds of stories into one great blockbuster of a book.

Book Greater Gotham

    Book Details:
  • Author : Mike Wallace
  • Publisher : Oxford University Press
  • Release : 2017
  • ISBN : 0195116356
  • Pages : 1195 pages

Download or read book Greater Gotham written by Mike Wallace and published by Oxford University Press. This book was released on 2017 with total page 1195 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: "Between consolidation and the end of World War One, New York was transformed and transforming, mirroring the juggernauting dynamism of the country at large--and largely fueling it. The names of two of its streets encapsulate the degree of the city's preeminence: Wall Street and Broadway. [This book] reveals the workings of the city's consolidation; the emerging hegemony of its financial markets, which effectively reconstructed U.S. capitalism; the influx of migrants from other continents and from the American South; the development of its massive infrastructure--subways and waterways and electrical grid; and New York's growing dominance over the arts, media, and entertainment"--Provided by publisher.

Book Gotham

    Book Details:
  • Author : Edwin G. Burrows
  • Publisher : Oxford University Press
  • Release : 1998-11-19
  • ISBN : 0199741204
  • Pages : 1413 pages

Download or read book Gotham written by Edwin G. Burrows and published by Oxford University Press. This book was released on 1998-11-19 with total page 1413 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: To European explorers, it was Eden, a paradise of waist-high grasses, towering stands of walnut, maple, chestnut, and oak, and forests that teemed with bears, wolves, raccoons, beavers, otters, and foxes. Today, it is the site of Broadway and Wall Street, the Empire State Building and the Statue of Liberty, and the home of millions of people, who have come from every corner of the nation and the globe. In Gotham, Edwin G. Burrows and Mike Wallace have produced a monumental work of history, one that ranges from the Indian tribes that settled in and around the island of Manna-hata, to the consolidation of the five boroughs into Greater New York in 1898. It is an epic narrative, a story as vast and as varied as the city it chronicles, and it underscores that the history of New York is the story of our nation. Readers will relive the tumultuous early years of New Amsterdam under the Dutch West India Company, Peter Stuyvesant's despotic regime, Indian wars, slave resistance and revolt, the Revolutionary War and the defeat of Washington's army on Brooklyn Heights, the destructive seven years of British occupation, New York as the nation's first capital, the duel between Aaron Burr and Alexander Hamilton, the Erie Canal and the coming of the railroads, the growth of the city as a port and financial center, the infamous draft riots of the Civil War, the great flood of immigrants, the rise of mass entertainment such as vaudeville and Coney Island, the building of the Brooklyn Bridge and the birth of the skyscraper. Here too is a cast of thousands--the rebel Jacob Leisler and the reformer Joanna Bethune; Clement Moore, who saved Greenwich Village from the city's street-grid plan; Herman Melville, who painted disillusioned portraits of city life; and Walt Whitman, who happily celebrated that same life. We meet the rebel Jacob Leisler and the reformer Joanna Bethune; Boss Tweed and his nemesis, cartoonist Thomas Nast; Emma Goldman and Nellie Bly; Jacob Riis and Horace Greeley; police commissioner Theodore Roosevelt; Colonel Waring and his "white angels" (who revolutionized the sanitation department); millionaires John Jacob Astor, Cornelius Vanderbilt, August Belmont, and William Randolph Hearst; and hundreds more who left their mark on this great city. The events and people who crowd these pages guarantee that this is no mere local history. It is in fact a portrait of the heart and soul of America, and a book that will mesmerize everyone interested in the peaks and valleys of American life as found in the greatest city on earth. Gotham is a dazzling read, a fast-paced, brilliant narrative that carries the reader along as it threads hundreds of stories into one great blockbuster of a book.

Book Building Gotham

    Book Details:
  • Author : Keith D. Revell
  • Publisher : JHU Press
  • Release : 2003
  • ISBN : 9780801882067
  • Pages : 348 pages

Download or read book Building Gotham written by Keith D. Revell and published by JHU Press. This book was released on 2003 with total page 348 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: These issues of city-building and institutional change involved more than the familiar push and pull of interest groups or battles between bosses, reformers, immigrants, and natives. Revell explores the ways in which technical values - a distinctive civic culture of expertise - helped to reshape ideas of community, generate new centers of public authority, and change the physical landscape of New York City."--Jacket.

Book A New Deal for New York

Download or read book A New Deal for New York written by Mike Wallace and published by Bell & Weiland Publishers/Gotham Center Books. This book was released on 2002 with total page 136 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: Discusses a new way of thinking about the future of New York City following the attack of September 11th, arguing for a broad plan for improvement including such projects as a revitalized port and more affordable housing.

Book New York City

    Book Details:
  • Author : George J. Lankevich
  • Publisher : NYU Press
  • Release : 2002-09
  • ISBN : 9780814751862
  • Pages : 308 pages

Download or read book New York City written by George J. Lankevich and published by NYU Press. This book was released on 2002-09 with total page 308 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: Previously published as An American Metropolis, this book is a punchy, definitive history of New York and has been updated to include new material on the Giuliani administration and the events of September 2001.

Book Emerald City

    Book Details:
  • Author : Joseph Grosso
  • Publisher : John Hunt Publishing
  • Release : 2020-11-27
  • ISBN : 1789045371
  • Pages : 184 pages

Download or read book Emerald City written by Joseph Grosso and published by John Hunt Publishing. This book was released on 2020-11-27 with total page 184 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: Joseph Grosso traces the history of New York's transformation back into a gilded city, and asks what can be done about it. He examines New York's deindustrialization and the elite planning and design that followed; New York's financial crisis of the mid-1970s and the policy decisions made in its wake; New York's housing crisis; and the history of public housing across the United States. Making the history of gentrification and deindustrialization widely available and understood is a crucial tool in combating housing crises which continue to spread in cities around the world as more and more houses are left empty, to be used for global investments instead of for living. Fresh, lively, accessible, Grosso brings the issues of gentrification, deindustrialization, homelessness, and militarized policing, so easily ignored, to the fore.

Book A Maritime History of New York

Download or read book A Maritime History of New York written by and published by Going Coastal, Inc.. This book was released on 2004 with total page 336 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: Originally compiled in 1941, this republication retains its cast of colorful characters--ranging from pirates and smugglers to merchants and public officials--and includes new historical information and updated material.

Book The Cat Men of Gotham

    Book Details:
  • Author : Peggy Gavan
  • Publisher : Rutgers University Press
  • Release : 2019-05-03
  • ISBN : 1978800223
  • Pages : 290 pages

Download or read book The Cat Men of Gotham written by Peggy Gavan and published by Rutgers University Press. This book was released on 2019-05-03 with total page 290 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: This book tells the stories of the tender-hearted men who adopted stray cats from the cruel streets of nineteenth- and early twentieth-century New York. Its forty-two profiles introduce us to an array of remarkable men and extraordinary cats, including sports team mascots, artists' muses, and presidential pets.

Book King s Handbook of New York City

Download or read book King s Handbook of New York City written by Moses King and published by . This book was released on 1892 with total page 938 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt:

Book The Island at the Center of the World

Download or read book The Island at the Center of the World written by Russell Shorto and published by Vintage. This book was released on 2005-04-12 with total page 418 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: In a riveting, groundbreaking narrative, Russell Shorto tells the story of New Netherland, the Dutch colony which pre-dated the Pilgrims and established ideals of tolerance and individual rights that shaped American history. "Astonishing . . . A book that will permanently alter the way we regard our collective past." --The New York Times When the British wrested New Amsterdam from the Dutch in 1664, the truth about its thriving, polyglot society began to disappear into myths about an island purchased for 24 dollars and a cartoonish peg-legged governor. But the story of the Dutch colony of New Netherland was merely lost, not destroyed: 12,000 pages of its records–recently declared a national treasure–are now being translated. Russell Shorto draws on this remarkable archive in The Island at the Center of the World, which has been hailed by The New York Times as “a book that will permanently alter the way we regard our collective past.” The Dutch colony pre-dated the “original” thirteen colonies, yet it seems strikingly familiar. Its capital was cosmopolitan and multi-ethnic, and its citizens valued free trade, individual rights, and religious freedom. Their champion was a progressive, young lawyer named Adriaen van der Donck, who emerges in these pages as a forgotten American patriot and whose political vision brought him into conflict with Peter Stuyvesant, the autocratic director of the Dutch colony. The struggle between these two strong-willed men laid the foundation for New York City and helped shape American culture. The Island at the Center of the World uncovers a lost world and offers a surprising new perspective on our own.

Book American Metropolis

    Book Details:
  • Author : George J. Lankevich
  • Publisher : NYU Press
  • Release : 1998-06-01
  • ISBN : 9780814751497
  • Pages : 273 pages

Download or read book American Metropolis written by George J. Lankevich and published by NYU Press. This book was released on 1998-06-01 with total page 273 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: Magnet for the ambitious, lodestone for talented and oppressed alike, Mecca for businessmen and immigrants, New York City has presided for over 350 years as the critical center of American life. From its origins as a primitive Dutch outpost to the sprawling urban complex it is today, the defining characteristic of New York has been continuous, dramatic, and rapid change. Historian George J. Lankevich's volume concentrates on political and economic affairs, illustrating how New York has always combined principle and pragmatism in its role as pace-setter in business communications, education, urban policy, and cultural life. American Metropolis is loosely divided into three historical epochs, each spanning roughly one of the last three centuries. In its early years, New York was defined by trial and tribulation; wars, fires, rebellions, and revolution were guiding influences on the colonial port. Nineteenth-century New York history was dominated by heroic figures in the form of bosses, reformers, merchant princes and statesmen, by enormous population increases, and by the achievement of commercial, financial, and cultural supremacy. For much of the twentieth century, greater New York, plagued by crime, white flight, fiscal trauma, and decay, embodied the nation's urban crisis. Its current Renaissance stands as fresh testimony to its characteristic vitality and resilience. Emphasizing the cyclical nature of New York's history through tides of crisis and renewal, George J. Lankevich here offers the definitive short history of America's most important and vibrant metropolis. By understanding the history of New York, we obtain a vital sense of what America was, is, and can become.

Book Transfiguring America

Download or read book Transfiguring America written by Jeffrey Steele and published by University of Missouri Press. This book was released on 2001 with total page 344 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: Transfiguring America is the product of more than ten years of research and numerous published articles on Margaret Fuller, arguably America's first feminist theorist and one of the most important woman writers in the nineteenth century. Focusing on Fuller's development of a powerful language that paired cultural critique with mythmaking, Steele shows why her writing had such a vital impact on the woman's rights movement and modern conceptions of gender. This groundbreaking study pays special attention to the ways in which Fuller's feminist consciousness and social theory emerged out of her mourning for herself and others, her dialogue with Emersonian Transcendentalism, and her eclectic reading in occult and mythical sources. Transfiguring America is the first book to provide detailed analyses of all of Fuller's major texts, including her mystical Dial essays, correspondence with Emerson, Summer on the Lakes, 1844 poetry, Woman in the Nineteenth Century, and New York Tribune essays written both in New York and Europe. Starting from her own profound sense of loss as a marginalized woman, Fuller eventually recognized the ways in which the foundational myths of American society, buttressed by conservative religious ideologies, replicated dysfunctional images of manhood and womanhood. With Woman in the Nineteenth Century, after exploring the roots of oppression in her essays and poetry, Fuller advanced the cause of woman's rights by conceptualizing a more fluid and equitable model of gender founded upon the mythical reconfiguration of human potential. But as her horizons expanded, Fuller demanded not only political equality for women, but also emotional, intellectual, and spiritual freedom for all victims of social oppression. By the end of her career, Steele shows, Fuller had blended personal experience and cultural critique into the imaginative reconstruction of American society. Beginning with a fervent belief in personal reform, she ended her career with the apocalyptic conviction that the dominant myths both of selfhood and national identity must be transfigured. Out of the ashes of personal turmoil and political revolution, she looked for the phoenix of a revitalized society founded upon the ideal of political justice.

Book Evangelical Gotham

    Book Details:
  • Author : Kyle B. Roberts
  • Publisher : University of Chicago Press
  • Release : 2016-11-07
  • ISBN : 022638814X
  • Pages : 349 pages

Download or read book Evangelical Gotham written by Kyle B. Roberts and published by University of Chicago Press. This book was released on 2016-11-07 with total page 349 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: Kyle Roberts explores the role of evangelical religion in the making of antebellum New York City and its spiritual marketplace. Between the American Revolution and the War of 1812a period of rebuilding after seven years of British occupationevangelicals emphasized individual conversion and rapidly expanded the number of their congregations. Then, up to the Panic of 1837, evangelicals shifted their focus from their own salvation to that of their neighbors, through the use of domestic missions, Seamen s Bethels, tract publishing, free churches, and abolitionism. Finally, in the decades before the Civil War, the city s dramatic expansion overwhelmed evangelicals, whose target audiences shifted, building priorities changed, and approaches to neighborhood and ethnicity evolved. By that time, though, evangelicals and the city had already shaped each other in profound ways, with New York becoming a national center of evangelicalism."

Book City of Workers  City of Struggle

Download or read book City of Workers City of Struggle written by Joshua B. Freeman and published by Columbia University Press. This book was released on 2019-04-30 with total page 560 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: From the founding of New Amsterdam until today, working people have helped create and re-create the City of New York through their struggles. Starting with artisans and slaves in colonial New York and ranging all the way to twenty-first-century gig-economy workers, this book tells the story of New York’s labor history anew. City of Workers, City of Struggle brings together essays by leading historians of New York and a wealth of illustrations, offering rich descriptions of work, daily life, and political struggle. It recounts how workers have developed formal and informal groups not only to advance their own interests but also to pursue a vision of what the city should be like and whom it should be for. The book goes beyond the largely white, male wage workers in mainstream labor organizations who have dominated the history of labor movements to look at enslaved people, indentured servants, domestic workers, sex workers, day laborers, and others who have had to fight not only their masters and employers but also labor groups that often excluded them. Through their stories—how they fought for inclusion or developed their own ways to advance—it recenters labor history for contemporary struggles. City of Workers, City of Struggle offers the definitive account of the four-hundred-year history of efforts by New York workers to improve their lives and their communities. In association with the exhibition City of Workers, City of Struggle: How Labor Movements Changed New York at the Museum of the City of New York

Book Empire City

    Book Details:
  • Author : Kenneth T. Jackson
  • Publisher : Columbia University Press
  • Release : 2002
  • ISBN : 9780231109086
  • Pages : 1026 pages

Download or read book Empire City written by Kenneth T. Jackson and published by Columbia University Press. This book was released on 2002 with total page 1026 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: This major anthology brings together the best literary writing about New York--from O. Henry, Theodore Dreiser, F. Scott Fitzgerald, and John Steinbeck to Paul Auster and James Baldwin.

Book Sculpture in Gotham

    Book Details:
  • Author : Michele H. Bogart
  • Publisher : Reaktion Books
  • Release : 2018-07-15
  • ISBN : 178023922X
  • Pages : 288 pages

Download or read book Sculpture in Gotham written by Michele H. Bogart and published by Reaktion Books. This book was released on 2018-07-15 with total page 288 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: Public sculpture is a major draw in today’s cities, and nowhere is this more the case than in New York. In the Big Apple, urban art has become synonymous with the municipal “brand,” highlighting the metropolis as vibrant, creative, tolerant, orderly, and above all, safe. Sculpture in Gotham tells the story of how the City of New York came to be committed to public art patronage beginning in the mid-1960s. In that era of political turbulence, cultural activists and city officials for a time shifted away from traditional monuments, joining forces to sponsor ambitious sculptural projects as an instrument for urban revitalization. Focusing on specific people, agencies and organizations, and both temporary and permanent projects, from the 1960s forward, Michele H. Bogart reveals the changing forms and meanings of municipal public art. Sculpture in Gotham illustrates how such shifts came about at a time when art theories and styles were morphing markedly, and when municipalities were reeling from racial unrest, economic decline, and countercultural challenges—to culture as well as the state. While sculptural installations on New York City property took time and were not without controversy, Gotham’s processes and policies produced notable results, providing precedents and lessons for cities the world over.